Standing Splits | Adaptive Yoga | Blocks

Welcome to Broz Fitness, Welcome to Today’s Naked Yoga. As always, our goal is never just to create videos but to inform and motivate you. You can see more of our Livestream and the Latest Uploads at the Broz Fitness YouTube Channel. You can also check out our latest Gear Reviews.

Alan demonstrates Standing Splits while also teaching the importance of drawing the core in and pointing the toes toward the ground. His left leg is firmly planted, his right leg is raised and his right arm reaches out to a cork yoga block to support his pose.
Alan demonstrates drawing the core in and pointing the toes down during Prop-Supported Standing Splits .

Trainer’s Notes:

Please talk to your doctor about whether you are healthy enough to begin physical activity before you do so. You assume all risk in beginning and performing various exercise movements.

Adaptive Yoga is an important skill for everyone to know as they approach their yoga practice because it can influence how you provide support for your body. Often times, I feel so stubborn when I am practicing: I need to look good without props. But adding in some blocks to your practice can really change things up.

This particular pose is about a little challenging pose we know of as Standing Splits. Standing Splits, or Urdhva Prasarita Eka Padasana, is a little challenging if a practitioner has any spinal issues, low back (lumbar spine) issues, trouble with the Hamstrings and/or the Gluteal Muscles, or otherwise if the practitioner has issues with blood pressure. Because of the movement of the head below the waist and the counter pose where the practitioner returns to half-lift, this move can sometimes cause a little dizziness. If any of these problems occurs, it might be a great time to check in with your physician to ensure that physical activity is right for you, or if there is a particular form of exercise more suited to your body.

You can see my review of cork blocks vs. foam blocks vs. bamboo blocks.

Standing Splits – Urdhva Prasarita Eka Padasana

Alan demonstrates Standing Splits assisted by two cork yoga blocks under his hands. His right foot presses into the earth his left leg is in the air.
Alan demonstrates Standing Splits assisted by two cork yoga blocks under his hands. His right foot presses into the earth his left leg is in the ai

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Standing splits can be one of the most strengthening yoga poses we embrace in our practice every day. This is because it requires you to engage the core, the whole of the leg, and the gluteal muscles in order to point the toes down to the earth. For this reason alone, it is a fairly superior movement.

It is also a forward fold. Forward folds are great at targeting the throat chakra. The openness it provides brings about a sensation of cleansing breath when I am able to find an adequate forward fold. This emphasis on the throat chakra during standing splits allows us to notice how forward folds can be so impactful.

Press all four corners of the right foot and all the toes

into the ground as you start to feel weightlessness in the left.

Inhale as you draw the left leg up keeping the toes

and the knees pointed down toward the Earth.

It is important to keep in mind, this pose may not be for everyone and that is okay. Check out our Adaptive Yoga page. If you are able to draw it up only slightly, that is okay too! You are enough, no matter how far you can get your leg up in this fairly challenging pose. Regardless, keep trying every chance you get. You can see how much Alan’s standing splits have improved over the course of our videos on the Broz Fitness YouTube Channel.

Benefits of Standing Splits

In short, this pose is great for opening the Throat Chakra and promotes strengthening the muscles of the leg. Moreover, this pose helps promote balance. I frequently use blocks in this pose because it helps me feel like I am getting enough space to draw my leg up. Throughout the last few months, you can absolutely see how it’s impacted my Standing Splits.

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Manduka Macys.com

Help keep my Workouts financially accessible for all and support LGBTQIA-friendly brands by making purchases (from which I will receive commission) for gear and equipment through my links.

  1. I’m wearing Andrew Christian briefs from www.andrewchristian.com.
  2. I’m part of the lululemon collective and will receive a commission if you make a purchase through the links below: https://lululemon.prf.hn/l/6na02q4.
  3. Pick up dumbbells and other weight training equipment: Shop SPRI’s Weight Resistance Training Equipment.
  4. If lifting isn’t really your thing, Home Sweet Home Gym. Get Free Shipping on the Bowflex C6 Bike. Ends 11/16.

    (Really though! It’s the link that matters, as they move your computer through a sequence whereby the targeted website places cookie on your computer from which my affiliates are able to determine that you’ve purchased after clicking on my links.)


A Splits Practice

Alan teaches a yoga class intending to promote openness in the body.

How I teach Standing Splits with Blocks

I typically teach this pose after we are all warmed up. One of the better times for this pose is likely when a teacher feels it’s time to get into chair pose. This could be during the Sun Salutation B warm-up. I would add that one of the more important things to keep in mind, and the purpose of this post, is that I have been using yoga blocks when coming in and out of this pose. I have been intently working on this pose for the last few months and I still love the lengthening sensation I find when I use yoga blocks. Moreover, because the pose provides lengthening, it’s not until the end of the practice that I eventually will try to remove the blocks. I would like to see my leg raise a little more; however, once the leg comes above the hips, it becomes almost necessary to begin to hinge from the hips and embrace this pose’s forward fold movement.

I think standing splits is better because it provides a gluteal muscle focused movement rather than a chair pose which largely targets the quads and the gluteal muscles. Although it sounds beneficial that a chair pose would provide quadriceps and gluteal muscle engagement, the quadriceps focus puts the gluteal muscles at a disadvantage. See Contreras, Glute Lab. To alleviate potential muscle imbalances caused by chair pose, we can use standing splits poses and variations to find more leg engagement. You can also do a feel similar sensations when you do a one-legged downward-facing dog. 

Poses to How I Typically Warm-Up Standing Splits

  1. Cat/Cow
  2. Warm-Up Bend
  3. Warm-Up Twist
  4. Tadasana
  5. Half-Lift
  6. Forward Fold
  7. Sun Salutation A
  8. Warrior 1 or Crescent Lunge
  9. Warrior 2 if I need a little more movement.

Conclusion

We will all get old over time. This keeps a constant pressure in me to find ways into poses that provide us a safe alternatives built upon more traditional movements and practices. Even Iyengar noticed this as he continued to find adaptations that get us into poses. Iyengar did so because he found himself getting older and found his body could not do the same movements as he was able to before. Even if we’re otherwise perfectly healthy, learning safe alternatives to more traditional poses will come in handy one day. You can see more adaptive yoga at the Adaptive Yoga page or check out the posts below!

I wrote this post with (sponsored link) Grammarly. You can see my review of Grammarly here.


Growing Gluteal Muscles | Intermediate Naked Yoga

Welcome to Broz Fitness, Welcome to Today’s Naked Yoga. As always, our goal is never just to create videos but to inform and motivate you. You can see more of our Livestream and the Latest Uploads at the Broz Fitness YouTube Channel. You can also check out our latest Gear Reviews.

Alan stands ready to deliver the Naked Yoga Monologue.

In the Yoga class focusing on the glutei this week, I move us through a series of asana intended to get at the thighs. We work the hamstrings and the gluteal muscles throughout this vinyasa. This is a little more challenging than our usual asana practice. If you have not taken a moment or do not consider your yoga practice to be intermediate, it is highly suggested that you would true a more introductory level yoga class from our lineup.

Trainer’s Notes:

Please talk to your doctor about whether you are healthy enough to begin physical activity before you do so. You assume all risk in beginning and performing various exercise movements.

To summarize this practice, we spend a lot of time working through Standing Split movements. When we do so, we are emphasizing movements of the leg with full engagement of the thigh and the gluteal muscles. These subtle movements are what I would recommend to my personal training clients who are working on the gluteal muscles. This is because the gluteal muscles help support us as we move our body in all directions. More importantly, it helps us for bracing. Bracing is what you do when you engage the core and the gluteal muscles together to help support your body into more complex poses.

Moreover, we took more seriously the need to engage with our breath throughout the practice this week. This is seen in this class as well as the classes from the past few days. We also take key opportunities to engage and work through our body scans by tapping into before-and-after experiences. This is a new feature of classes the past few days. By self-assessing ourselves at the beginning and end of a practice, we can learn more about what our body is trying to say to us. One of the more prominent exercises I have featured is the experience of trying cold water. When we assess our body through a body scan, we can follow this up, attempting to inhale energy into the tight parts of our body. This example with the cold water allows us to assess ourselves prior to the simple act of drinking water. We follow up the assessment with actually drinking the water. At the end of the exercise, you take a moment to scan the body again and notice anything what were feeling that has changed. I think this is a particularly impactful exercise because it can show how our body manifests our discomfort. The simple act of consuming cold water helps us reassess ourselves and perhaps, just for a moment, take ourselves less seriously and relax. 

In all, this practice targets lengthening the muscles of the legs and takes time to move us into strengthening exercises. 

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Manduka Purple

Help keep my Yoga Practice financially accessible for all and support LGBTQIA-friendly brands by making purchases (from which I will receive commission) for gear and equipment through my links.

  1. I’m wearing Andrew Christian briefs from www.andrewchristian.com.
  2. I’m part of the lululemon collective and will receive a commission if you make a purchase through the links below: https://lululemon.prf.hn/l/6na02q4.
  3. Pick up dumbbells and other weight training equipment: Shop SPRI’s Weight Resistance Training Equipment.
  4. Find my Naked Drake Yoga playlist and my Gay Rap playlist at Apple Music: Get 70 million songs free for 3 months with Apple Music.

    (Really though! It’s the link that matters, as they move your computer through a sequence whereby the targeted website places cookie on your computer from which my affiliates are able to determine that you’ve purchased after clicking on my links

What Were the Goals of This Class?

Some of the sensations that I want to bring about with the class include:

  1. Engaging all four corners of the foot to engage in the inside thighs.
  2. Finding balance by stacking the joints before we begin more challenging poses.
  3. The gluteal muscles are the seat to everything!

On this last point, I teach a gluteal muscle class every week because I want to make sure that my students, who are more likely to be sitting in front of a screen all day, are able to get out of their seats and strengthen their seat. One of my favorite queer theorists uses this example: as you sit all day in your squishy seat, your squishy seat becomes you. 

Core Work

Alan demonstrates a core exercise drawing the right knee to the nose while in a standing one-legged downward-facing dog.

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Throughout the last two weeks, we have been working on core movements. Specifically, getting movement for the gluteal muscles and then moving into more intense core work at the end. Initially, we begin in a downward-facing dog pose. After the downward-facing dog, we move into a more standard practice of (1) “draw your leg to the sky” (2) “draw your knee to your nose.” We move through this in tandem with our breath to cultivate a sense of sameness with the breath as we focus on difficult core work. 

Alan demonstrates a core exercise drawing the left knee to the nose while in a standing one-legged downward-facing dog.

At the end of the class, we reinforce this by taking a moment to work on our leg lifts and our swimmer kicks. These are important because they intensify a focus on the lower abs. We spend a ton of time “drawing the low-belly in,” and it’s important to build upon that work by providing the core with the muscle growth necessary to continue to meet our needs in practice. Hence why this class is titled more appropriately as an intermediate yoga class. 

Adaptive Work

As I hope I’ve previously stressed, incorporating adaptive yoga techniques is critical to creating a more inclusive yoga space and practice. Throughout the practice, I seek to build upon the foundation we have been building throughout the last few weeks. When we create stability, we can create more growth. Slow progress is always better than quickly stepping into something we’re more uncertain of.

Alan demonstrates a standing split using yoga blocks as props to support his body.

As I will discuss below, I find that the standing splits pose is one of a couple of better options within the category of bodyweight exercise that really packs a powerful “grow” on the gluteal muscles. As you can see in the picture for this section, it’s particularly important to squeeze the gluteal muscles while bringing the hips to an even level to get the best muscle growth out of the poses. Here, I also take this pose to the blocks as we have been doing the past few practices. By incorporating blocks and learning to use them regularly, we can create more space for the upper body, allowing the practitioner to focus on “squeezing the glutes” and “balancing the hips.”

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One of the beautiful features of adaptive yoga is choosing when you want to remain in adaptive poses to create more space. Over time, you can continue to build on an adaptive practice. Alternatively, you can work toward different expressions of standing splits.

Alan demonstrates the utility of bringing the feet toward their respective sides to create more space for the hips.

Perhaps another adaptive technique worth discussing from this class was using the mat to create more space for the lower body. When we take the time and space for our bodies, we can feel more stability in our pose. One example I use in this class is to bring the feet out to the edges as a stand in Warrior 2. This is an important adaptation, especially when I feel like I am having trouble remaining in a pose like Warrior 2. By creating space for the hips, I can decrease my self-consciousness that I’m not quite stacked in the correct places; it can also provide new sensations I’m not otherwise experienced much. 

Alan demonstrates Anjaneyasana, low lunge, with his right leg back and left foot forward.

We initially begin a new sequence with low lunge work. We press into the front leg to create more space and engage all parts of the thigh. We take a moment to focus on the calves, and then we move into half-splits. I would add that attempting to create more spaces removed my ability to stack the joints. Typically I suggest that we move toward the direction of stacking the joints. However, to move toward an alternative expression of the hips, we begin to move the feet further apart.

Half-Splits Adaptive

Alan demonstrates progress as we bring our feet a little further apart in Adaptive Half-Splits pose.

Another position we can continue to build on with blocks is the pose I’ll discuss, without blocks, next. The half-splits pose helps us work towards a full expression of the splits. We have been working on splits throughout the last few weeks. You can even see it paying off in this practice today. I am super proud of the way of how this turns out today. At the end of the expression, we work to draw the distance between our feet to create more space and develop more muscle memory around the splits. 

Half-Splits

I move us through standing splits and half-splits poses at different points in the practice. As we attempt to gather the gumption to get into more challenging full-expressions of the splits, I keep trying to emphasize the necessity of lengthening and strengthening with my students. Lengthening is what we all associate with yoga. However, by taking the opportunity to move through more stabilizing movements such as a repeated standing split, we engage the core and create muscle memories that support us when we come into more challenging crescent lunges and the warrior sequences. 

The Final Twists

Alan demonstrates thunderbolt pose with a twist to the left.

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Just before we get into the class’s final exercises, we take a moment to move through some more twists. These twists create more space and help us achieve a fuller sense of our proprioception. Ultimately, we choose to take a twist in thunderbolt pose after we work on some gluteal muscle stuff.

Alan demonstrates Crescent Lunge with a twist to the right.

I wanted to include multiple twists at the end. As such, we move to Crescent Lunge and in toward a twist. When we do this, we change the focus from our legs towards breathing while we remain in a twist. When we do this, we work on our valuable proprioception. To review, proprioception is our sense of our body in time and space. When we do activities to increase our sense of proprioception, we can better assess and adjust where our body is in time and space.

End Gluteal Muscle Movements

At the end of the practice, I move us through exercises rather than more formalized yoga poses. 

Initially, we begin with gluteal movements such as a knee flexion movement. This is of particular importance in our growth because Knee Flexion exercises remove the hamstrings’ ability and the quadriceps to act as synergists with the gluteal muscles. In short, by activating the gluteal muscles in this way, we can ask more of our seats. After we work through this knee flexion exercise, we follow the movement with a child’s pose to restore the neutral spine. 

The Class

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Conclusion:

I have been particularly mindful of how important my naked yoga practice has been to my overall yoga practice. I have a ton of fun teaching these practices because all the stress I carry, I have to let go of; otherwise, you can see me holding onto it during the practice. I lose the stress of what I am wearing into the practice when I teach Naked Yoga and this is particularly impactful. There should be no stress in what you’re wearing to the practice and I have sought to demonstrate it through “taking myself a little less seriously” and wearing white briefs or other types of underwear throughout the last few weeks. As I continue to build on this valuable practice, I hope to incorporate more opportunities for the class to notice when we’re taking ourselves too seriously and can use this as a resource to understand critical improvements to relax.

Finally, as I have mentioned, I hold a ton of value in building our gluteal muscles. This is, simply, because the gluteal muscles help support all forms of our practices. Strong gluteal muscles can help support us in back bends, in forward bends, and all over the mat. I hope this practice can help work towards supporting this intention.

I wrote this post with (sponsored link) Grammarly. You can see my review of Grammarly here.


Yoga for Runners | Beginner Yoga

The cold is upon us in Denver. With the cold outside, I’m finding it more critical to stay warm with varied yoga sequences. I had specific movements on my mind, and I wanted to make sure that we got to them while using adaptive yoga techniques. In this instance, we work a lot with Yoga Blocks as props. 

The peak poses I chose for today were Pigeon, Revolved Crescent Lunge, and Supta Baddha Konasana. I wanted to make sure that we got into poses that create more space in the upper body. We worked out our chest and triceps today; the poses we take today are a reflection of such.

In the video, I added a quote from Yoga Anatomy by Leslie Kaminoff. I make mention of Prana. While I recognize that Pranayama practice typically comes at the end of the sequence, I wanted to emphasize for my students taking notice of the breath at the beginning of the class. This quote from Kaminoff emphasizes that Prana can include many different sources of life-sustaining energy. In short, Prana can be food, sunshine, and as we’re made more aware of during yoga: the breath.

I have been trying to add more Yoga and Personal Trainer literature to my reading list. If you have any suggestions, let me know.

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Manduka Purple

Help keep my Yoga Practice financially accessible for all and support LGBTQIA-friendly brands by making purchases (from which I will receive commission) for gear and equipment through my links.

  1. I’m wearing Andrew Christian briefs from www.andrewchristian.com.
  2. I’m part of the lululemon collective and will receive a commission if you make a purchase through the links below: https://lululemon.prf.hn/l/6na02q4.
  3. Pick up dumbbells and other weight training equipment: Shop SPRI’s Weight Resistance Training Equipment.
  4. Find my Naked Drake Yoga playlist and my Gay Rap playlist at Apple Music: Get 70 million songs free for 3 months with Apple Music.

    (Really though! It’s the link that matters, as they move your computer through a sequence whereby the targeted website places cookie on your computer from which my affiliates are able to determine that you’ve purchased after clicking on my links

Active Rest

We begin today in active rest. Active rest provides a chance for the yogi to come into an awareness of their breath. We take a few minutes to work on settling the breath in before we get into warm-up poses. From Meditation, I borrow the technique of lengthening the time between inhales and exhales. I suggest we start at two counts in, two counts out, but by the end of it, I felt more comfortable moving into longer four counts in, four counts out breaths. By settling the class into relaxation rather than merely beginning the class with warm-ups, we are more clearly able to set an intention for the practice. We then work to activate our ujjayi breath.

Props

As I come to the close of my official Yoga Teacher training, I notice that I have been afraid to use props in every pose. Although I am a big fan of Yoga Blocks, I am unlikely to use them after the first few movements in our vinyasa. However, in today’s class, I take extra time to demonstrate various poses so that the poses will feel more accessible to more people. For example, I exhibit a chair pose incorporating Yoga Blocks. 

Warm-Up

The poses I suggest to warm-up in this class mostly kept us in an easy-seated position. We move through bends, twists, and cat/cow sequence while remaining in a seated position. 

Cool-Down

Rather than our usual bridge pose sequences, I take the class today through a more standard bridge pose with an interlaced-fingers variation. We also take the opportunity to sit in a more open-armed Supta Baddha Konasana. Since I usually teach this pose in Restorative Yoga, I could lay in Supta for a pretty long time. It sometimes feels weird to translate it into a quicker vinyasa sequence.

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The Class:

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The Best In Athletic Training Products At SPRI.com!

Reflections

I decided to name this class Yoga for Runners. As my discussion so far has detailed, through the poses and feelings we moved through, I sought to bring about a sense of relaxation without digging too deeply into Restorative or Yin Yoga.

Another strange feature of teaching yoga has been how all of these different yoga types make me feel. I practiced ashtanga yoga for many years as a student, without realizing how this would later translate to my yoga teacher training. In this class, I tried to remain in line with my previous quick flow vinyasa sequence training.

I wrote this post with (sponsored link) Grammarly. You can see my review of Grammarly here.

Biceps (and Legs) | Dumbbell Superset Workout


Welcome to Broz Fitness, Welcome to Today’s Resistance Training Workout. As always, our goal is never just to create videos but to inform and motivate you. You can see more of our Livestream and the Latest Uploads at the Broz Fitness YouTube Channel. You can also check out our latest Gear Reviews.

Trainer’s Notes:

Today’s workout focused instead on the arms (biceps) rather than the legs. We worked on our legs by focusing on bicep exercises that incorporated leg movements.

Most importantly, ensure that you are choosing the proper weight for your body right now. In yoga, we have the principle of Non-Violence, Ahisma, which we do not have in resistance training. This Superset Workout is an advanced lifting technique that should be consulted by more intermediate to advanced lifters. I use dumbbells for today’s workout.

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Manduka Macys.com

Help keep my Workouts financially accessible for all and support LGBTQIA-friendly brands by making purchases (from which I will receive commission) for gear and equipment through my links.

  1. I’m wearing Andrew Christian briefs from www.andrewchristian.com.
  2. I’m part of the lululemon collective and will receive a commission if you make a purchase through the links below: https://lululemon.prf.hn/l/6na02q4.
  3. Pick up dumbbells and other weight training equipment: Shop SPRI’s Weight Resistance Training Equipment.
  4. If lifting isn’t really your thing, Home Sweet Home Gym. Get Free Shipping on the Bowflex C6 Bike. Ends 11/16.

    (Really though! It’s the link that matters, as they move your computer through a sequence whereby the targeted website places cookie on your computer from which my affiliates are able to determine that you’ve purchased after clicking on my links.)


Bicep Curl with Leg Raise

Alan demonstrates a biceps curl with a leg raise.

Keeping with today’s theme, I started at Bicep Curls with a Leg Raise. I raised the weight to 20lb dumbbells. My use of 20lb dumbbells is a little heavier than I have been using lately. As I mentioned, I focused recently on fatiguing the antagonist muscles before working the prime mover. Since I am primarily working on the biceps, I follow up on the squat quadriceps-targeting movement with Forward Lunges with a Bicep Curl. 

To move through this exercise, emphasizing the correct muscles, I keep my elbows tucked in. The increased proprioception created by simultaneously lifting my leg helps increase my core engagement as well. I attempt to raise my leg above my hips, though I am sometimes not quite there. 


Forward Lunges with Bicep Curl

Alan demonstrates a lunge with a biceps curl.

One of the primary cues of a forward lunge emphasizes moving the forward leg with the knee somewhere above the ankle. By stacking the ankle and the knee, we protect the knee, one of the more frequently-occurring things I see in my clients.

I have been writing Burnout Workouts that incorporate forward-moving lunges. Forward-moving lunges typically focus move on the quadriceps and less on the hamstrings than reverse lunges. Try This: Complete a Forward Lunge and a Backwards Lunge.


Squat with Hammer Curl

Alan demonstrates a hammer curl with a squat.

A traditional squat focuses on the quadriceps and the gluteal muscles. I was kind of shocked reading Glute Lab by Bret Contreras as it must not have registered until then: A lunge is a one-legged squat. It was sort of life-changing because once I realized this was the movement involved in squatting in lunging, it helped create more mind-muscle awareness. 

When I do biceps curls, I tuck my elbows into my shoulders while emphasizing that mind-muscle connection. I think to myself, “my biceps are getting bigger when I exercise them.” I like this positive self-talk because it helps reinforce that I am always working on my body; it also strengthens self-confidence that the things I am exercising on are working.

I often see guides instructing people to get below the knee with the gluteals to ensure more active gluteal muscle engagement. I think this would be ideal in a world where we are not working with individuals who have previous injuries. I have tighter ankles and while I practice and teach yoga almost every day, I find that no matter how loose I can get my quadriceps, getting below my knee is not my top priority. This is not to say that it would not be productive to the gluteal muscles or that I should stop working on my calf flexibility. Instead, I feel it necessary to continue to work on my squat, perhaps at lower weights, while I work on my calf flexibility.


Biceps W-Curl

Alan demonstrates a Biceps W-Curl.

I drop the weight on these Biceps W-Curls. I like W-Curls because they tend to focus on the more nuanced muscles inside the arms. The interiors of the arms, the inside biceps, are not as intensely focused on when I do standard bicep curls and even when I drop the weight to 6lb dumbbells, as I did today, I still feel that excellent pump.


The Workout

This is a Silent Workout Video. Alan Demonstrates Bicep-Focused Movements.

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Conclusion

This workout primarily targets the biceps and the quadriceps. This particular focus is a change-up from our typical Leg Day, where we have focused intensely on activating the upper gluteal muscles. 

Downward Facing Dog | Adaptive Yoga | Blocks

Welcome to Broz Fitness, Welcome to Today’s Naked Yoga. As always, our goal is never just to create videos but to inform and motivate you. You can see more of our Livestream and the Latest Uploads at the Broz Fitness YouTube Channel. You can also check out our latest Gear Reviews.

Trainer’s Notes:

Please talk to your doctor about whether you are healthy enough to begin physical activity before you do so. You assume all risk in beginning and performing various exercise movements.

Adaptive Yoga is an important skill for everyone to know as they approach their yoga practice because it can influence how you provide support for your body. Often times, I feel so stubborn when I am practicing: I need to look good without props. But adding in some blocks to your practice can really change things up.

You can see my review of cork blocks vs. foam blocks vs. bamboo blocks.

Downward Facing Dog with Blocks

Alan demonstrates Downward Facing Dog incorporating two cork Yoga Blocks.
Alan demonstrates Downward Facing Dog incorporating two Yoga Blocks.

I think I like downward facing dog with blocks the most because of the way it feels on my shoulders. I feel like I am more capable of pressing my weight into my feet in a way I am unable to do without the blocks.

Here, you can see me pressing into the blocks while my heels have not quite made it to the mat. I find more space in my upper body to press through my hands into my blocks. I have them on a medium setting here and sometimes I will drop them down to the lower setting in order to make more space for my hands.

(sponsored links)

Manduka Macys.com

Help keep my Workouts financially accessible for all and support LGBTQIA-friendly brands by making purchases (from which I will receive commission) for gear and equipment through my links.

  1. I’m wearing Andrew Christian briefs from www.andrewchristian.com.
  2. I’m part of the lululemon collective and will receive a commission if you make a purchase through the links below: https://lululemon.prf.hn/l/6na02q4.
  3. Pick up dumbbells and other weight training equipment: Shop SPRI’s Weight Resistance Training Equipment.
  4. If lifting isn’t really your thing, Home Sweet Home Gym. Get Free Shipping on the Bowflex C6 Bike. Ends 11/16.

    (Really though! It’s the link that matters, as they move your computer through a sequence whereby the targeted website places cookie on your computer from which my affiliates are able to determine that you’ve purchased after clicking on my links.)

Exhale, Press your Hands into your Yoga Blocks.

Draw your Hips to the Sky:

Downward Facing Dog.

Alan demonstrates a table top modification incorporating cork blocks.

Even if Downward Facing dog is not so much in my practice whenever I start, moving into the position from a table-top position makes it feel a little easier when you make it up to the top.

Alan demonstrates Downward Facing Dog incorporating two cork blocks during a Naked Yoga Class.

I have it on the medium height again because it makes just a little bit more space for me to reach down and through. I like the lower one when I plan to stay in Downward Facing Dog for awhile.

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Resistance Training | Chest and Triceps | Barbell and Cable


Welcome to Broz Fitness, Welcome to Today’s Resistance Training Workout. As always, our goal is never just to create videos but to inform and motivate you. You can see more of our Livestream and the Latest Uploads at the Broz Fitness YouTube Channel. You can also check out our latest Gear Reviews.

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Trainer’s Notes:

Please talk to your doctor about whether you are healthy enough to begin physical activity before you do so. You assume all risk in beginning and performing various exercise movements.

Today’s chest workout focused on triceps and the upper chest. I wanted to isolate the top of my chest in order to promote more growth as I went through today’s superset.

Some of the photos below have been from previous workouts. You can see my review of the lululemon shorts I’m wearing here.

Triceps Push-Ups

Alan demonstrates an incline push-up.

I chose to use inclined push-ups, as I wanted to make sure I had enough energy to get through lifting.

Incline Bench Press

Although I used a barbell above, substitutions can include a pair (or single if dumbbell if I wanted to emphasize my core strength.

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The Workout (and my Notes)

  1. Triceps Pull Down Rope (Cable Machine) x10-12
    • I worked to keep my elbows tucked into my sides while I performed this movement, keeping the triceps engaged throughout.
  2. Incline Bench Press (Barbell) x10-12
    • I have been sticking to approximately the same weight every time I have been doing this. In order to try to alleviate this problem, I wanted to make sure I added some more movements focusing on the shoulders while I performed incline and upper chest focused exercises. I think adding an upper chest day separated from a mid/low chest day will be a significant adjustment to my chest work.
  3. Triceps Pull Down (1-Arm) (Cable Machine) x10-12
    • These were intense today. I mentioned that I was going to seek to include movements which exhaust the antagonist muscles. The triceps are antagonists in this case and by emphasizing triceps before I work on my bench press, I think that I am able to increase emphasis on my chest. Here, having moved through chest movements and having started with a triceps pull down, I was a little unprepared for how intense this movement would be.
    • I kept my elbows tucked into my sides performing this movement. By keeping the elbows tucked into my sides, I am able to emphasize the triceps and prevent myself from rocking the weights back and forth or using momentum to complete the movement.
  4. Chest Fly (1-Arm) (Cable Machine) x10-12
    • I kept a micro-bend in my elbow in order to ensure that I could maintain appropriate tension and protect my shoulder. I like chest fly and I chose to do a more lateral chest fly here in order to emphasize the shoulders and the upper chest as I brought the cable down.
  5. Triceps Push-Up x10-12
    • These usually get me, especially because I put them in after I just completed something a little difficult. Outside of this workout, I did a ton of push-ups. I dropped to my knees eventually!
  6. Incline Bench Fly x10-12
    • I think bench chest fly is one of my more favorited chest movements outside of a standard bench press. I always feel the most engagement when I squeeze my chest throughout the movement.

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Inclusivity in Yoga | Naked Yoga Shorts | Conditioning

Welcome to Broz Fitness, Welcome to Today’s Naked Yoga. As always, our goal is never just to create videos but to inform and motivate you. You can see more of our Livestream and the Latest Uploads at the Broz Fitness YouTube Channel. You can also check out our latest Gear Reviews.


This past Halloween weekend gave us a ton of personal yoga practice. It was nice to bring down the cameras for a little bit and knock out a ton more of Alan’s 300-Hour Yoga Teacher training. Alan has been working on his the remainder of his 500-Hour Yoga Teacher certification so that we can provide our followers the best Yoga Experience that we can.

Today, I write about inclusivity and about the latest class series that we’ve released: Naked Yoga Shorts. These shorts are super important short yoga sessions in order to show everyone that you can do Yoga in many ways from Yoga Blocks to Chair Yoga to Restorative Yoga.

Trainer’s Notes:

Please talk to your doctor about whether you are healthy enough to begin physical activity before you do so. You assume all risk in beginning and performing various exercise movements.

Pace and Silence:

Sometimes keeping up with the pace of my Naked Yoga Bear Series classes has been a little difficult. Whenever I start to notice that I am getting a little sweaty, I should probably make sure that I recognize that my students are feeling the same way. I have been trying to find ways to include everyone in my classes, especially things like looking back to the YouTube chat. You can also always reach out to Broz Fitness on Social Media.

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Under the light of Pace and Silence, I’ll start to find a way to make more inclusive classes where I can figure out how to do so. I have some ideas that I am working on to teach a more silent class so that you can receive cuing without having to be able to hear me.

One of the more fun things we can do to make sure that our students get access to more accommodating classes is to be more inclusive with our adaptive yoga instruction. I’ve been trying to teach a ton more classes where I demonstrate how to use Yoga Blocks throughout our practices.


Should vs. Notice

I need to own the language of my classes a little more. By providing the agency to my students, I might be able to allow more people to feel that they can access my classes. I always try to acknowledge to the class that my poses are simply suggestions, however, I think in my most recent completion of lectures, I think I can do better to invite my students to “notice” the feeling that they’re having in their body.


Today’s Yoga Shorts Practice:


Manduka Purple

Help keep my Yoga Practice financially accessible for all and support LGBTQIA-friendly brands by making purchases (from which I will receive commission) for gear and equipment through my links.

  1. I’m wearing Andrew Christian briefs from www.andrewchristian.com.
  2. I’m part of the lululemon collective and will receive a commission if you make a purchase through the links below: https://lululemon.prf.hn/l/6na02q4.
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HIIT Workout 1 | Hamstrings

Welcome to Broz Fitness, Welcome to Today’s Naked Yoga. As always, our goal is never just to create videos but to inform and motivate you. You can see more of our Livestream and the Latest Uploads at the Broz Fitness YouTube Channel. You can also check out our latest Gear Reviews.

Trainer’s Notes:

Please talk to your doctor about whether you are healthy enough to begin physical activity before you do so. You assume all risk in beginning and performing various exercise movements.

Today’s workout includes a High Intensity Interval Training round and a set of Dumbbell Exercises. This workout is for an intermediate lifter. Caution is advised if you are new to lifting. If you have any questions, you can always reach out to us here or on social media below. Because this workout also targets the legs, you should make sure that you spend 48 hours resting between the next workout.

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I doubt there are many people who do not appreciate a set of good Hamstrings. These muscles, located on the bottom of the thighs when you are seated or posteriorly if you’re standing looking at the anatomical man.

In today’s legs and biceps Workout, we begin with a 10 minute high intensity interval training style warm-up. this warm-up incorporated movements which are intended to be performed only if you have sufficient stability to perform them. You can check out more appropriate workouts here.


Manduka Purple

Help keep my Yoga Practice financially accessible for all and support LGBTQIA-friendly brands by making purchases (from which I will receive commission) for gear and equipment through my links.

  1. I’m wearing Andrew Christian briefs from www.andrewchristian.com.
  2. I’m part of the lululemon collective and will receive a commission if you make a purchase through the links below: https://lululemon.prf.hn/l/6na02q4.
  3. Pick up dumbbells and other weight training equipment: Shop SPRI’s Weight Resistance Training Equipment.
  4. Find my Naked Drake Yoga playlist and my Gay Rap playlist at Apple Music: Get 70 million songs free for 3 months with Apple Music.

    (Really though! It’s the link that matters, as they move your computer through a sequence whereby the targeted website places cookie on your computer from which my affiliates are able to determine that you’ve purchased after clicking on my links

When I was designing this workout this week, I was trying to incorporate movements which fatigue the hamstrings and the quadriceps while incorporating other movements which target the Gluteal Muscles directly. This is similar to one of the advanced training methods discussed in Bret Contreras’s Glute Lab.

I have recently been incorporating this form of training in my latest workouts. I think one of the cooler pumps that I have been finding when I work those Butt Muscles is probably after doing anything isolating the hamstrings. The stability ball curl literally drains me. You can see it in this Burnout Workout from Monday. I find that isolating the hamstrings makes me feel like I am going to walk with that lifting walk for the next few days.

Moreover, this workout also incorporates workout movements that aren’t just about the standard deadlift. We work on two different forms of squats in order to target the quads.




Warm-Up HIIT Portion of the Workout:

When we get into this workout, we start by stretching out the legs by hugging the knees into our chest. We then move into high leg kicks where we kick up to bring a small stretch to the hamstrings before we begin more complex movements including jogging. I was pretty committed to making sure that I finished 4 per set. As well, you can see that I have some cones set up to help guide myself as I work through this Leg Workout today.

We kick it up and move into snap kicks next. Focus on bringing the leg forward. We turn next to scissor kicks. I secretly love scissor kicks because I feel like I get the pump on my legs for a good set of effort. I try to channel different body builders and one of my favorites uses the scissor kick.

We pick up the pace a little bit with high knees next. I would suggest you find a 10 yard space, I don’t have that much space and it’s been pretty cold in Denver. We rinse and repeat this same circuit for the duration of this HIIT warm-up.


Resistance Training Set:

You should take a look at the HIIT Workout above before moving onto this workout.

The Equipment:

In the resistance training workout, we fire things up using two different sets of dumbbells, a 10lb slam ball, and a stability ball. I wanted to create an at-home workout that’s fairly easy to execute with light weight dumbbells and a slam ball. I think that the stability ball, however, is probably the most important. This workout directly targets the Hamstrings.

Front Squats x12

We begin working with front squats, placing the dumbbells at or above our shoulders while pointing the elbows forward. After this we move on to a knee flexion exercise incorporating a stability ball. I think these things are really really intense we take them to a full extension here. In the video I mentioned above, about the Burnout Workout, we do about half-extensions to get to 100 Leg Curls. They are really, really underestimated. Following a superset after doing these Stability Ball Leg Curls grows some Gluteal Muscles.

Ball Rotations x12

We move onto a Slam Ball Rotational Exercise.In this movement we incorporate return to both sides while twisting the back foot up. This movement targets the core and glutes and for that reason I think it should be incorporated into our movements at least once a week. We continue pushing, doing 12 on each side.

Squat with Bicep Curl x12

We then move onto squat with a bicep curl. I admittedly wish I made it down a little farther with my squats. This could have been fixed by lowering the weight of the bicep curls. Make sure that you tuck the elbows into the sides of the body to keep engagement throughout the bicep curl.

Frog Pumps x12

We finish up with Dumbell-Weighted Frog Pumps, twelve for this set. Admittedly, I wish I would have chosen a more appropriate Glute Bridge exercise. I wanted to create a workout that requires Relatively little equipment in this work out felt pretty apt towards that until it came to the glute bridge. I have been working on my frog pump for the past few days and I still have not found that perfect amount of gluteal activation that leaves me walking funny. We’re always a fan of the Leg Days that leave you walking funny.

Dumbbell Workout Conclusion:

This was a pretty intense workout today. If you took the time to do the HIIT workout and the dumbbell workout in a pair, give yourself a big hug, you did an awesome job. Today’s workout should be followed up with appropriate care, ensure that you avoid working the legs tomorrow, as well, you could probably do well to avoid working on the biceps because of the Squats with the Bicep Curl we did.

If you’re super pumped, have a ton of experience with stability and are ready to see the Burnout Workout, get to it. Otherwise, go take a walk, take the day off from working out tomorrow if you feel a little more sore than usual. As always, you should take the time following your workout to get your body back to adequate hydration levels.

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Side note: If you’re looking for Supplements, Orgain has some of our favorite protein blends. Check them out if you’re looking for a better protein blend.

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Restorative Yoga | Root Chakra Sequence 7

Welcome to Broz Fitness, Welcome to Today’s Naked Yoga. As always, our goal is never just to create videos but to inform and motivate you. You can see more of our Livestream and the Latest Uploads at the Broz Fitness YouTube Channel. You can also check out our latest Gear Reviews.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is 2020.10.28-Restorative-1024x576.jpg
Alan demonstrates a seated scan of the body.

Trainer’s Notes:

Please talk to your doctor about whether you are healthy enough to begin physical activity before you do so. You assume all risk in beginning and performing various exercise movements.

In tonight’s restorative yoga class, we move through five different poses and a fairly lengthy breathing exercise at the beginning. Oh, and the heat came back on, and we all finally figured out wide legged forward fold.

We also take a moment to go through a little bit more of an advanced version of Supta Baddha Konasana.

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Manduka Purple

Help keep my Yoga Practice financially accessible for all and support LGBTQIA-friendly brands by making purchases (from which I will receive commission) for gear and equipment through my links.

  1. I’m wearing Andrew Christian briefs from www.andrewchristian.com.
  2. I’m part of the lululemon collective and will receive a commission if you make a purchase through the links below: https://lululemon.prf.hn/l/6na02q4.
  3. Pick up dumbbells and other weight training equipment: Shop SPRI’s Weight Resistance Training Equipment.
  4. Find my Naked Drake Yoga playlist and my Gay Rap playlist at Apple Music: Get 70 million songs free for 3 months with Apple Music.

    (Really though! It’s the link that matters, as they move your computer through a sequence whereby the targeted website places cookie on your computer from which my affiliates are able to determine that you’ve purchased after clicking on my links

I really appreciate a good Restorative Yoga practice because I always feel a little bit more relaxed before bed and then I’m ready to pass out face-first into my mattress.

Today’s Class:


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Which Yoga Block Do I Use!? Foam Blocks vs. Bamboo Blocks vs. Cork Blocks: A Yoga Block Review Guide

Welcome to Broz Fitness, Welcome to Today’s Gear Review. Today, Alan will review three different materials for yoga blocks: Foam Blocks, Bamboo Blocks, and Cork Blocks.

Alan demonstrates Malasana, yoga squat, while supporting his body with two cork yoga blocks. He presses his hands together in front of his heart, while pressing his knees into his elbows and elbows into his knees.

Alan’s Review:

I think one of the hardest parts of navigating workout gear is that when you read all these reviews online that something fell apart when the reviewer first started using it, as a reader, I am left to feel unsure what to think. I think I find that some of the reviews online are just posted because someone got a product that did not look great when it arrived and largely, I assume these reviews are taken care of by customer service. It is much more difficult to filter those reviews out against the real concerns that people have. Today, I will be reviewing three different styles of yoga block to help explain what works for my students and I in different parts of yoga that I teach throughout the week. As such, I will review a foam block, bamboo block, and cork block. This review will eventually become part of the 2020 Fitness Gear Gift Guide.

Each of these products were purchased with my own money, for my own practice, and they each have unique characteristics. If you happen to click through any of the links contained within this post and purchase gear for yourself, Broz Fitness, as an affiliate for many of these companies, will likely receive a commission.

Alan’s Findings:

Looking to all of the facts known at the time of writing this review, I conclude that the cork blocks are the best choice without other blocks. You can see the variety of purposes that I use these blocks for throughout the week. I find that my restorative yoga practice really relies upon the foam blocks when I do not necessarily need direct support of my body but using a yoga bolster or a yoga blanket might feel too overwhelming or too soft. Next, I find that the wooden (bamboo) blocks are really great for times or poses when I want the sturdiest of support such as one-legged forward fold (standing splits). Finally, I find that when I teach more ashtanga-influenced yoga, I like to have support from the cork block because of the variety of uses I can employ for it in the middle of the class without having to rely on multiple sets of yoga props. Because every body is different, I take into account my own experiences as a yoga teacher. Ultimately, I conclude that the cork blocks are the best all-around for the things that I use them for.

Yoga blocks can be used for a variety of things in your daily life and definitely not just yoga. There are countless times where we have used yoga blocks to prop up iPads so that we can be a little lazier as we rest and watch a show. I also secretly use them for the cats to hide behind when we play. I think this is one of my more favorite uses for yoga blocks because they are seriously cute when they hide behind the blocks. You can also use them to support things that you wouldn’t otherwise think of. I have seen people use yoga blocks to hold the over-the-head headphones so that they are not just lying around or in a box somewhere. I also sometimes use them to prevent my Roomba from going into an area where I don’t want them to go.

A Restorative Yoga Class Incorporating All Three Blocks:

Alan teaches a Restorative Yoga Class incorporating All Three Types of Blocks Reviewed Here.

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Manduka Macys.com

Help keep my Workouts financially accessible for all and support LGBTQIA-friendly brands by making purchases (from which I will receive commission) for gear and equipment through my links.

  1. I’m wearing Andrew Christian briefs from www.andrewchristian.com.
  2. I’m part of the lululemon collective and will receive a commission if you make a purchase through the links below: https://lululemon.prf.hn/l/6na02q4.
  3. Pick up dumbbells and other weight training equipment: Shop SPRI’s Weight Resistance Training Equipment.
  4. If lifting isn’t really your thing, Home Sweet Home Gym. Get Free Shipping on the Bowflex C6 Bike. Ends 11/16.

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Part 1. Foam Block is Comforting but Uncertain: Too soft.

Initially, I think one of the first things that I would say about foam blocks is that they are really good for less-supported body parts in restorative yoga poses. Anytime you need to rest your body against something but do not necessarily need the block to be there to completely support your body, I like to use a foam block. I think one of the most important times that I use foam blocks is in restorative reclined bound-angle pose: supta baddha konasana. I think the give (resistance) that they provide feels really comforting for some body parts in some of the poses I use them for. I had to eventually learn that they were the best blocks that I had for restorative yoga. By this time, I was using them for supporting my yoga bolster when I laid in the restorative supta baddha konasana with my back on a yoga bolster. However, I think when I do not use a yoga bolster, I end up using the foam blocks to support my knees rather than any of the other things that I have in terms of blocks.

1.1. Foam Blocks are Really Good for Restorative Poses where Body Parts Rest Against the Block.

In supta baddha konasana, we come into the pose placing our feet together and our knees outward. When we do this, one of the restorative modifications includes using a block. You could also use a blanket here, however, the foam block seems to provide the most support while also being comfortable. I find that I want to rest my thighs against something supportive and soft and this is where the foam blocks really outperform the bamboo blocks and the cork blocks.

When I was initially buying yoga blocks, I found that I wanted to support my yoga bolster against a smaller bamboo block. What I eventually learned is that I would need the broader blocks in order to support the yoga bolster. Just the fact that they were foam blocks made me feel like they were not going to be very supportive. I resisted using foam blocks to support the bolster so much, but they turned out to be really good and very supportive.

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1.2. I Do Not Feel as Supported by Foam Blocks as I Want in Poses Such as Standing Splits.

I have been teaching a lot of standing splits lately. I think this is one of the biggest detractions from foam blocks for me. When I press my hands in the blocks or rest my hands on them, I get this feeling that I am about to fall. I think this is because maybe the particular blocks that I’m using are so supportive or it could be that they give that is intended to be in a foam block just doesn’t feel comfortable for my body in this position.

Part 2. Wood Blocks. Sturdy but Too Sturdy: Too hard.

I initially did not even want to think about buying foam blocks. So, when I did buy the bamboo blocks I did not even think about the size and I think I ended up with smaller depth blocks. I would initially use the wooden blocks in order to support my yoga bolster because it felt like it would be sturdier, but I learned the very valuable lesson that you need to use a broader set of block in order to be able to more effectively support the bolster. This was a really valuable lesson.

In terms of practicing with them I think that sometimes they are really sturdy for times when you feel like you need to use something sturdier. When you use the blocks for poses or movements where you need a little bit of give, they definitely never give the floor has to give first. Most frequently when I lay in restorative poses, I use the bamboo blocks to support my forearms because they are a little smaller and a little more comforting for my body type.

2.1. Wooden Blocks are Very Sturdy.

You will see a short heading down below that one of the cons of bamboo blocks is that they’re too sturdy, I will write here about the pros on the basis of them being so sturdy. Standing splits is a really complicated pose for me and it makes me feel really insecure when I cannot raise my leg very high because I am trying to engage other parts of my body to feel more supported. This goes away as the practice continues, but the feeling of falling forward makes me feel afraid that I will engage some muscle and risk pulling it. I think having the ability to support myself using the sturdier yoga blocks makes me feel, even if just psychologically, more secure about where my body is in space and time.

2.2. Seriously Though, Wooden Blocks are Very Sturdy.

I think in terms of proprioceptive difficulty, albeit likely very subtle, the fact that the blocks are so sturdy allow me to rest against them a little bit more and rely on them a little more. I think that in terms of a proprioceptive challenge, if I use a block that has a little bit less resistance, one that I can sink into a little bit, that I have to engage more of my muscles (whether this is a good thing is beyond the scope of this review) in order to support my body. As I was reviewing these poses through the blocks just now, I feel my body trying to support itself a little more when I used the foam blocks whereas I just required my body to provide sufficient resistance against the wooden block.

Manduka

Part 3. Cork Blocks. Give and Support: Just Right.

I am really biased towards cork blocks. I think this bias comes after having use the two soft foam blocks, to the harder wooden blocks. It’s funny as I was writing this post, I wasn’t even thinking about the Goldilocks story until about halfway and suddenly I realized I was being Goldilocks with my yoga blocks. It is true, there are times when I feel the need for extra sturdy support even if it is to fulfill something psychological as I go into a yoga pose. There are times when I want a lot of give, especially for my knees in restorative poses. However, the cork blocks really provide a sturdy foundation while simultaneously being great for movements where I want a little more give.

3.1. Sturdiness with Give.

It is really important to me have the ability to use the blocks to resist against my body in order to get into a pose. The cue about blocks remains true: “use the blocks to bring the floor closer to you.” When the block is too soft or too hard it sometimes feels like the floor isn’t any closer to you than you needed it to be. When the block is too soft it can push you forward, it can push you back, or it can push you farther into poses that maybe you did not need to get that deep into. A cork block seems to fix many of these issues. I feel both support and comfort when I use these, and even though they may have some give where a wooden block might feel more appropriate, I think the fact that they do have a slight amount less of resistance than a wooden block might ultimately promote more safety in poses. On the one hand, having the ability to press against something that has moderate resistance may allow you to relax a particular part of your body you might have otherwise needed to keep engaged. This allows you to get into the pose, emphasizing the necessary parts of the body.

3.2. I Fear Unknown Scratchiness and Less Resistance (Foam Block) Might Be Better for Some Poses.

The poses I list above seem like they would be a little scratchy for the feeling of cork. Especially the one where you put your knees on them. Moreover, I think sometimes not having the ability to have the lessened resistance is detrimental. However, I do not think that the cons of the cork blocks overcome the pros such that the wooden block would be better than a cork block.

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Conclusion: The Cork Block is a Superior Choice for an All-Around Yoga Block.

As I mentioned I am really biased towards cork yoga blocks because of my Goldilocks sentiment. I really liked the wooden blocks initially and as I started to teach more styles of yoga, I realized the importance of having more and less resistance from a block for my body to rest and support itself against in different poses. Most especially as a restorative yoga teacher though, I realized the limitations of each of these blocks in restorative poses. This is especially true when I need students, and myself, to get into more relaxed supportive poses such as restorative bridge pose. I think the harder blocks made me feel supported initially, but as we continue to work through more leg supersets, I think that I am becoming a little more biased to the give of the cork blocks for my glutei.

Moreover, I recently used the cork blocks to support my hands and torso as I worked on the full splits and used the foam blocks to support my legs so that I could continue into the stretch without feeling like my legs were being pushed too much. The fact that the foam blocks were able to complement my cork blocks shows that it is not so easy as suggesting that one type of block is the best way to go. As well, I would also add that people sometimes like too soft and too hard. Goldilocks is just one person and Mama Bear and Daddy Bear had preferences too!

As such, I find that the cork blocks are the best choice against a foam block and a wooden block.


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